• Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Instagram

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

 

  -

November 28, 2021

Un niño nos es naçido - 
Villancicos in the run-up to Christmas

Why I'll be there

Column for “ Un niño nos es naçido ” by David Fallows

If my first love among early music repertories was the English carol, the second was quite definitely the Spanish villancico as found in the Cancionero de Palacio and the Cancionero de la Colombina, both from around 1500. Here too there was a directness of expression, an ability to convey a precise mood with the simplest of musical means, and a sheer muscularity of sound. The same characteristics remain in much Spanish music of the next century. 

What does change, though, is the meaning of the word 'villancico'. Around 1500 it was quite definitely a poetic form, on the lighter side, but nevertheless a form. By the end of the century, it means a Christmas song, but still with a lightness of touch that I find utterly appealing. And once again I wonder how the British managed to get their Christmas music so wrong when they had a marvelous repertory out there waiting for them. I have no idea how they celebrate Christmas in the Iberian Peninsula, though judging from the number of recordings of Riu riu chiu available even on YouTube perhaps they do value their heritage a bit more than the British. 

In any case I cannot imagine a better and more joyful start for the Christmas season than the November concert of ReRenaissance. My mouth is already watering. 

Count me in…  

Column on “Un niño nos es naçido” by David Fallows
 

If my first love among the early music repertoires may have been the English carol (Christmas carol), my second was clearly the Spanish Villancico, as can be found in the Cancionero de Palaci and Cancionero de la Colombina - both collections of songs from the Around 1500. Here, too, there is an immediacy in expression: the ability to convey a clear mood with the simplest musical means and the sheer power of sound. These characteristics can also be found in the Spanish music of the next century. 

What is changing, however, is the meaning of the word "villancico". Around 1500 it was clearly a poetic form, a rather light genre, but first and foremost a form. Towards the end of the century it means a Christmas carol, but still with an ease that I find very appealing. And once again I wonder how the British managed to get so astray with their Christmas music over time, when they had a wonderful repertoire at their disposal. I have no idea how to celebrate Christmas in the Iberian Peninsula, but if I look at the number of Riu riu chiu recordings that can even be found on YouTube, then maybe they value their legacy a little more than the British do. 

In any case, I can't think of a better and more joyful start to the Christmas season than ReRenaissance's November concert. My mouth is already watering.  

                         Translation: Marc Lewon

The monthly column for ReRenaissance,
this time by Prof. Dr. Martin Kirnbauer

 

 

 

October 31, 2021, 6.15 p.m.

Chantez gayement
From Geneva to Basel

Kolumnenmacher für Okt moi + Trichter_22-1-2010_trichtereien_PP_Martin Kirnbauer.jpg

Why I'll be there

Column for “Chantez gayement” by Martin Kirnbauer

A few years ago, while reviewing a new edition of Jerome's translation of the Bible, I came across the beautiful headline in the NZZ (Neue Zürcher Zeitung): “Until Luther, God spoke Latin.” One could take up the idea and continue that 'after Luther' he sang not only in German but also in French and many other languages, as the ReRenaissance concert on October 31 will show and bring to life.
In fact, the change of language was associated with one of the most far-reaching and radical changes in music triggered by the Reformation. In Basel, for example, the starting point was the congregational singing of the Psalms, which was practiced for the first time on Easter Sunday 1526. This not only changed the role of the clergy, who lost their exclusive position (and with them the organists , who literally became unemployed). The center of the service was now the sermon, framed by songs and psalms sung by the congregation - a 'participatory model', as we would call it today.
For this a new repertoire was needed, which was partly newly created, partly adapted to the new purpose by re-writing and reinterpreting well-known songs. In Basel, the first settings came from Strasbourg; later, those of the so-called “Geneva Psalter” were used, which was sung over hundreds of years and across all continents.
The ReRenaissance concert offers visitors the unique opportunity to sing along with the Psalms in a 're-enactment'. (But don't worry, there will be a rehearsal beforehand ...).

(Translation: Marc Lewon)

Count me in…   

Column about the concert on October 31, 2021

«Chantez gayement» by Martin Kirnbauer

A few years ago in the NZZ, while discussing a new edition of Jerome's translation of the Bible, I came across the beautiful headline: "Until Luther came, God spoke Latin." One could pick up on the idea that he sang 'after Luther' not only in German, but also in French and many other languages, as the ReRenaissance concert on October 31 shows and makes it tangible.
In fact, one of the most far-reaching and radical changes in music brought about by the Reformation was associated with the language change. In Basel, for example, the starting point is the parish chanting of the Psalms, which was first practiced in church services on Easter Sunday 1526. This not only changed the role of the clergy, which lost their exclusive position here (and with it the organists who literally became unemployed). At the center of the service was the sermon, which was framed by songs and psalms of the congregation - a 'participatory model' would be called it today.
For this a new repertoire was needed, some of which was newly created, and some of which was adapted to the new purpose by rewriting and reinterpreting well-known songs. In Basel, the first settings came from Strasbourg, later it was the so-called Geneva Psalter, which was sung for centuries and across all continents.
The ReRenaissance concert offers visitors the unique opportunity to sing along with the psalms in a 'reenactment'. (But don't worry, there is a rehearsal beforehand ...)

 

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

 

 

September 26, 2021

Canziones para menestriles

Brass music in northern Spain

 

 

Why I'll be there

Column for "Canzones para menestriles" by David Fallows

 

Having written far too many dictionary articles over the years, I have a special interest in 'spoof articles', particularly those concerning non-existent composers. And the earliest of these known to me in any music dictionary is in Robert Eitner's famous Quellen-Lexikon (1900–1904), where he gives 'Bergier, Ungay' as a composer of the sixteenth century. Though the article is perfectly solemn and factual, there can be no question that Eitner must immediately have recognized the title of Crequillon's most famous piece, Un gay bergier ('a happy shepherd'). But it will be good to hear it in this concert, even though the source they are using, the Lerma manuscript now in Utrecht, gave it as Un gay vergier ('a happy orchard').

       Lerma may not be a familiar name to many readers. And Wikipedia helpfully tells us that there are places called Lerma in Mexico, Italy and Argentina as well as in Spain. It also describes the Spanish Lerma as a village, albeit the headquarters of the famous wine Arlanza (accorded the DOP status in 2007). But in the years around 1600 it profited enormously from the marginally legal activities of the Duke of Lerma, chief political advisor to King Philip III, who built an enormous ducal palace and turned the local church of San Pedro into a well-endowed collegiate - so well-endowed that it employed a large number of musicians, including many wind players.

       So, Lerma is a much-loved name for any modern player of shawm, sackbut or cornetto because two magnificent 'choirbooks' were used in that collegiate. 'Choirbooks' may seem an odd word to use, since they were certainly not prepared to choirs: there is no text in either of them and they were plainly used by the wind players. But their layout is that of choirbooks, with all voices of a piece (between four and seven) laid out on a single double-page spread. These books are a goldmine for these musicians; and we must welcome the opportunity to hear a cross-section of their contents

Count me in …

Column on the concert on September 26th 21 «Canzones para menestriles» by David Fallows

 

 

Over the years I have written far too many lexicon articles and therefore developed a particular interest in "incorrect entries", especially those that refer to non-existent composers. The earliest article of this kind known to me in a music lexicon can be found in Robert Eitner's famous Quellen-Lexikon (1900–1904), where he presents "Bergier, Ungay" as a composer of the 16th century. Although the article is very serious and factual, there can be no doubt that Eitner must have recognized the title of Crequillon's most famous play, Un gay bergier ("A Merry Shepherd"). It will be good to hear the piece in this concert, even if the source used here, the Lerma manuscript now in Utrecht, reproduces it as Un gay vergier ("a happy orchard").

       The name Lerma is unlikely to be known to many readers. Wikipedia helps us with the fact that there are places called Lerma in Mexico, Italy and Argentina as well as in Spain. The Spanish Lerma is also described there as a village, albeit as the place of origin of the famous Arlanza wine (which received the DOP quality seal in 2007). In the years around 1600, however, the place benefited enormously from the legal activities of the Duke of Lerma, the most important political advisor to King Philip III, who had a huge ducal palace built and converted the local church of San Pedro into a well-equipped college - so good equipped to employ a large number of musicians, including many wind players.

       Lerma is therefore a highly valued term for every modern shawm player, slide trumpeter or tinker player, because two splendid "choir books" were used in this college. "Choral books" may be a strange word because these codices were certainly not intended for choral singing: there is no text in either book, and they were clearly used by the wind players. But their layout corresponds to that of choir books, in which all parts of a piece (between four and seven) are arranged on a single double page. These books are a treasure trove for our musicians, and we should take this opportunity to hear a sample of their content.

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

August 29, 2021

Mundus mirabilis domini Amerbachii

Dialogue of the keys to Basel

 

Why I'll be there

by David Fallows

 

Swiss libraries are particularly rich in keyboard tablatures of the sixteenth century: from the massive tablature of Fridolin Safe in St Gallen to the smaller but astonishingly useful Clemens Hör tablature in Zurich and the various volumes in Basel. In the course of my researches over the years these have all yielded surprizes and delights to me, even though keyboard music of the sixteenth century has never been directly central to my studies. But the many dimensions of musicianship shown by these manuscripts is astonishing; and I obviously more than welcome a concert devoted entirely to the performance of these arrangements.

 Count me in ...

by David Fallows

 

The Swiss libraries are particularly rich in keyboard tablature from the 16th century: from the extensive tablature by Fridolin Safe in St. Gallen to the smaller but astonishingly useful Clemens audio tablature in Zurich to the various sources in Basel. In the course of my research, all of them have brought surprises and joys to me over the years, although sixteenth-century keyboard music was never directly the focus of my studies. But the many dimensions of musicality that these manuscripts demonstrate are astonishing; and of course I warmly welcome a concert that is exclusively dedicated to the performance of these arrangements. 

Translation: Marc Lewon

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

February 28, 2021

Paper, ink, and pen


The five part books of the calligrapher Robert Dow: a musical self-portrait (1581/88)

Why I'll be there

by David Fallows

 

If last month's concert mostly devoted to Henry VIII was a rare, perhaps unique, event, the same could probably be said about July's Serafino concert. He may be the quintessential minimalist poet, since his output is mostly of strambotti, poems of only eight lines. The first printed edition of his poetry, published by the former Basel student Johannes Besicken in Rome in 1501, soon after the poet's death. at the age of only 34, contained 206 poems, but with each successive edition there were more until the 1516 edition of Giunta had 551. Not surprisingly, there is much disagreement about which are really his.

       He was particularly famous for singing his compositions to the lute, which rather implies unwritten transmission. But on very good authority he studied composition with the famous Flemish composer Guillaume Garnier, which implies written music, though nothing survives with his name on it. (For that matter, no music survives credited to Guillaume Garnier either: there are some enormous gaps in our knowledge of musical history during those years.) What everybody agrees about is that Serafino was a massive influence on the poetry and the singing of the next few generations. We must also agree that it will be most interesting to see how the musicians in our concert resolve those problems.

 

Count me in ...

by David Fallows

 

If last month's concert, especially dedicated to Henry VIII, was a rare, perhaps even unique event, the same could probably be said of the concert with works by Serafino d'Aquila in July. He is perhaps the epitome of the minimalist poet, because his oeuvre consists mainly of Strambotti, poems that are only eight lines long. The first printed edition of his poems, published in Rome in 1501 by the former Basel student Johannes Besicken, shortly after the poet's death at the age of only 34, contained 206 poems - with each subsequent edition, however, there were more, up to the edition by Giunta in 1516, which contains the whole 551. Unsurprisingly, there is a lot of disagreement about which ones are really his.

       Serafino was particularly famous for singing his compositions to the lute, which speaks more for a written tradition. But from very reliable sources it is known that he had learned composition from the famous Flemish composer Guillaume Garnier, which suggests notated music, although nothing has survived under his name. (Incidentally, no music by Guillaume Garnier has survived: our knowledge of the music history of these years shows some enormous gaps). What everyone agrees on is that Serafino had a massive impact on the poetry and singing of subsequent generations. We should also agree that it will be extremely interesting to see how the musicians in our concert will solve these problems.

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

June 27, 2021

Happy Birthday Henry!

Royal music for the 530th birthday

Why I'll be there

by David Fallows

 

Almost a third of the 109 pieces in British Library, Add. MS 31922, are headed either “The Kyng. H . viij ”or“ The Kynge. H . viij ”. Even though in three cases he seems just to have added a fourth voice to existing songs, experts appear to agree that the remainder are all his. Besides, we have a substantial and fairly complex motet, Quam pulchra es, credited to him in the commonplace-book of the Elizabethan singer John Baldwyn, and a chronicler of the time reported that he composed 'two goodly masses, every of them five parts , which were sung oftentimes in his chapel and afterwards in various other places'.

        Certainly Henry's compositions are uneven in quality, but I have never heard as many of them in a single concert (or indeed recording) as are offered here; so this will be a unique opportunity that cannot be missed.

        The same manuscript also includes works by composers in his chapel royal, particularly the marvelous William Cornysh. And - quite exceptionally - it includes works by continental composers, all presented anonymously. Among them is La my, the piece that Henricus Isaac famously wrote in two days while visiting the court of Ferrara in 1502. And, most interesting for me, there is the Fors seulement setting that was once known otherwise only from a manuscript in the Pepys Library with an ascription to Antoine de Fevin. More recent discoveries include a manuscript crediting it to Robert de Fevin. But the killer is its appearance anonymously in the printed collection of Trium vocum carmina (Nuremberg, 1538) to which a manuscript annotator added the name 'Josquin'. That annotator has recently been identified as Senfl's long-time colleague Lucas Wagenrieder. And in that copy he named composers for thirty-three of the hundred pieces in the collection: and only for Fors seulement is there a plausible counter-ascription elsewhere. That is to say that there would be a very good case for thinking that he was right and that the piece is really by Josquin Despres. And the Josquin year is surely a time to be rethinking some of our old assumptions about what he did or did not compose.

Ich bin dabei ...

von David Fallows

 

Als wir vor zwanzig Jahren die Feierlichkeiten für das 500. Jubiläum des kommerziellen Musikdrucks vorbereiteten – verkörpert in Petruccis Odhecaton –, hatte jemand den brillanten Einfall, einen «Odhecathon» aufzulegen, also ein gewaltiges Konzert mit allen 96 Stücken der Sammlung. Dann merkten wir, dass das vielleicht keine so gute Idee wäre: das Ganze würde zwar wohl weniger als vier Stunden dauern, es wäre aber mit Sicherheit ein Rezept für eine musikalische Magenverstimmung. Obendrein ginge diese Rechnung nur auf, wenn alle Stücke textlos aufgeführt würden, so wie Petrucci sie übermittelte. Ein Grossteil der Musik aber bestand aus Liedern in den «formes fixes» des 15. Jahrhunderts (also mit entsprechenden Wiederholungen von Formteilen), wovon einige zum Zeitpunkt des Drucks bereits 50 Jahre alt waren: Um der Musik gerecht zu werden, hätten wir sie in ihrer vollen Länge präsentieren müssen. Also eher um die 15 Stunden Gesamtlänge.

Diese Erkenntnis deutet zugleich aber auch auf das Ausmass von Petruccis Vorhaben hin: dass es einen Ehrenplatz in sämtlichen Musikgeschichten einnimmt hat seinen guten Grund. Petrucci war der erste, der die Kunst meisterte, ein umfangreiches Buch mensuraler Mehrstimmigkeit mit beweglichen Lettern zu drucken. Notendruck vor Petrucci bestand entweder aus einzeln geschnittenen Holzblöcken oder aus einstimmigem Choral – oftmals beschränkt auf nur wenige Seiten, wenngleich in den vorausgegangenen zehn Jahren einige grosse und schöne Choralbücher vor allem in Venedig gedruckt wurden. Was Petrucci unternahm, erforderte wesentlich mehr als das. Er musste eine Technik erfinden, um Noten zu drucken und auszurichten. Er musste einen vollständig neuen Schriftsatz für Musik schneiden und giessen – und das gelang ihm in einer derartigen Schönheit, dass er bis ins 19. Jahrhundert hinein kaum überboten wurde. Er musste seine Drucker einweisen und ihnen beibringen, das Papier in drei aufeinanderfolgenden Durchläufen so auszurichten, dass die Noten an den genau richtigen Stellen auf den Notenlinien zu liegen kamen: die Ergebnisse sind erstaunlich exakt, selbst nach heutigen, computergesteuerten Massstäben. Er hatte die Musik auszuwählen und einzurichten: an die 200 Stücke für die ersten drei Bände. Er musste Mittel aufbringen, um das Unternehmen zu finanzieren. Es nimmt wahrlich Wunder, dass ein unbedeutender Mann aus der winzigen Provinzstadt Fossombrone dies in Venedig zustande gebracht haben sollte. Seine eindrucksvollste Leistung aber war, dass er in den kommenden acht Jahren einen beständigen Fluss an neuen Notenbüchern auf den Markt bringen sollte – mehr als fünfzig Veröffentlichungen. In diesen Jahren löste das gedruckte Buch die Handschrift als wichtigstes Medium für die Übermittlung mehrstimmiger Musik ab. Dieser Wandel war das nahezu alleinige Verdienst Petruccis.

Übersetzung: Marc Lewon

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

February 28, 2021

Paper, ink, and pen


The five part books of the calligrapher Robert Dow: a musical self-portrait (1581/88)

Why I'll be there

by David Fallows

 

To Paris and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, where in the manuscript room you can see three lovely manuscripts devoted to the Italian court dance of the fifteenth century. Between them they tell almost the whole story. All three include music for the dances, monophonic music that looks mensural but has problems; and you need only add the manuscript of Antonio Cornazano in the Vatican Library to have the entire musical repertory.

        One of the Paris manuscripts describes the work of Domenico da Piacenza, reportedly the main creator of the genre; the other two give the work of Guglielmo Ebreo da Pesaro and Giovanni Ambrosio da Pesaro. And it was some time before anybody figured out that the last two are the same person, who took a new name when he converted to Christendom. This event celebrates six hundred years from his likely birth in 1420. (The concert was originally planned for May 2020 and for obvious reasons needed to be put back a year.)

        All three are beautifully written - though the loveliest and most complete of the ballo manuscripts is the one in Siena, immaculately written on parchment (all the others are on paper). But, as I said, it is not at all clear what the musical notation tells us, because all the sources appear to have been written by people who knew more about dancing and beautiful calligraphy than about music. They certainly do not match the notational techniques known from hundreds of musical manuscripts from all over Europe of the fifteenth century. Over the years there have been various different interpretations; and so far as I know the jury is still out (actually, I am not sure it is even in yet). Even so, the information about the dance choreographies is clearer; and the job of the musician today is to create a suitable framework for those dance steps.

Ich bin dabei ...

von David Fallows

 

Als wir vor zwanzig Jahren die Feierlichkeiten für das 500. Jubiläum des kommerziellen Musikdrucks vorbereiteten – verkörpert in Petruccis Odhecaton –, hatte jemand den brillanten Einfall, einen «Odhecathon» aufzulegen, also ein gewaltiges Konzert mit allen 96 Stücken der Sammlung. Dann merkten wir, dass das vielleicht keine so gute Idee wäre: das Ganze würde zwar wohl weniger als vier Stunden dauern, es wäre aber mit Sicherheit ein Rezept für eine musikalische Magenverstimmung. Obendrein ginge diese Rechnung nur auf, wenn alle Stücke textlos aufgeführt würden, so wie Petrucci sie übermittelte. Ein Grossteil der Musik aber bestand aus Liedern in den «formes fixes» des 15. Jahrhunderts (also mit entsprechenden Wiederholungen von Formteilen), wovon einige zum Zeitpunkt des Drucks bereits 50 Jahre alt waren: Um der Musik gerecht zu werden, hätten wir sie in ihrer vollen Länge präsentieren müssen. Also eher um die 15 Stunden Gesamtlänge.

Diese Erkenntnis deutet zugleich aber auch auf das Ausmass von Petruccis Vorhaben hin: dass es einen Ehrenplatz in sämtlichen Musikgeschichten einnimmt hat seinen guten Grund. Petrucci war der erste, der die Kunst meisterte, ein umfangreiches Buch mensuraler Mehrstimmigkeit mit beweglichen Lettern zu drucken. Notendruck vor Petrucci bestand entweder aus einzeln geschnittenen Holzblöcken oder aus einstimmigem Choral – oftmals beschränkt auf nur wenige Seiten, wenngleich in den vorausgegangenen zehn Jahren einige grosse und schöne Choralbücher vor allem in Venedig gedruckt wurden. Was Petrucci unternahm, erforderte wesentlich mehr als das. Er musste eine Technik erfinden, um Noten zu drucken und auszurichten. Er musste einen vollständig neuen Schriftsatz für Musik schneiden und giessen – und das gelang ihm in einer derartigen Schönheit, dass er bis ins 19. Jahrhundert hinein kaum überboten wurde. Er musste seine Drucker einweisen und ihnen beibringen, das Papier in drei aufeinanderfolgenden Durchläufen so auszurichten, dass die Noten an den genau richtigen Stellen auf den Notenlinien zu liegen kamen: die Ergebnisse sind erstaunlich exakt, selbst nach heutigen, computergesteuerten Massstäben. Er hatte die Musik auszuwählen und einzurichten: an die 200 Stücke für die ersten drei Bände. Er musste Mittel aufbringen, um das Unternehmen zu finanzieren. Es nimmt wahrlich Wunder, dass ein unbedeutender Mann aus der winzigen Provinzstadt Fossombrone dies in Venedig zustande gebracht haben sollte. Seine eindrucksvollste Leistung aber war, dass er in den kommenden acht Jahren einen beständigen Fluss an neuen Notenbüchern auf den Markt bringen sollte – mehr als fünfzig Veröffentlichungen. In diesen Jahren löste das gedruckte Buch die Handschrift als wichtigstes Medium für die Übermittlung mehrstimmiger Musik ab. Dieser Wandel war das nahezu alleinige Verdienst Petruccis.

Übersetzung: Marc Lewon

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

February 28, 2021

Paper, ink, and pen


The five part books of the calligrapher Robert Dow: a musical self-portrait (1581/88)

Why I'll be there

by David Fallows

 

Who is the purest composer of all? Some would go for Mozart. Others for Hildegard of Bingen. I would put in a very strong case for Orlando Gibbons or Webern. But surely the prize must go to Claudin de Sermisy. Every note is in its place; every gesture expressive; and he never, ever, raises his elbow. We think of him as the absolute quintessence of the Parisian chanson of the 1520s and 30s. Most of these pieces last only two or three minutes; but each defines and expresses its own world. In any case, hearing his music is like a cool shower on a hot day: you suddenly realize that the noise all the other composers generate is unnecessary.  

       So it is a particular pleasure to have a concert built on this repertory but with Claudin at all the key points in the program. And it is also a particular pleasure to hear him alongside his colleagues, some of them far more famous, some virtually unknown. And we can all decide for ourselves whether Claudin is really the purest of them all.  

       Pierre Attaingnant knew a thing or two about his clientele; and for the 1533 collection he printed words under everything but was in addition quite specific that the music was suitable for a group of transverse flutes or recorders. And in the hands of the right musicians these chansons lose very little without their texts. Once again, every piece is characterized with the utmost precision; and once again you would not want to change a single note. Enjoy.

Ich bin dabei ...

von David Fallows

 

Als wir vor zwanzig Jahren die Feierlichkeiten für das 500. Jubiläum des kommerziellen Musikdrucks vorbereiteten – verkörpert in Petruccis Odhecaton –, hatte jemand den brillanten Einfall, einen «Odhecathon» aufzulegen, also ein gewaltiges Konzert mit allen 96 Stücken der Sammlung. Dann merkten wir, dass das vielleicht keine so gute Idee wäre: das Ganze würde zwar wohl weniger als vier Stunden dauern, es wäre aber mit Sicherheit ein Rezept für eine musikalische Magenverstimmung. Obendrein ginge diese Rechnung nur auf, wenn alle Stücke textlos aufgeführt würden, so wie Petrucci sie übermittelte. Ein Grossteil der Musik aber bestand aus Liedern in den «formes fixes» des 15. Jahrhunderts (also mit entsprechenden Wiederholungen von Formteilen), wovon einige zum Zeitpunkt des Drucks bereits 50 Jahre alt waren: Um der Musik gerecht zu werden, hätten wir sie in ihrer vollen Länge präsentieren müssen. Also eher um die 15 Stunden Gesamtlänge.

Diese Erkenntnis deutet zugleich aber auch auf das Ausmass von Petruccis Vorhaben hin: dass es einen Ehrenplatz in sämtlichen Musikgeschichten einnimmt hat seinen guten Grund. Petrucci war der erste, der die Kunst meisterte, ein umfangreiches Buch mensuraler Mehrstimmigkeit mit beweglichen Lettern zu drucken. Notendruck vor Petrucci bestand entweder aus einzeln geschnittenen Holzblöcken oder aus einstimmigem Choral – oftmals beschränkt auf nur wenige Seiten, wenngleich in den vorausgegangenen zehn Jahren einige grosse und schöne Choralbücher vor allem in Venedig gedruckt wurden. Was Petrucci unternahm, erforderte wesentlich mehr als das. Er musste eine Technik erfinden, um Noten zu drucken und auszurichten. Er musste einen vollständig neuen Schriftsatz für Musik schneiden und giessen – und das gelang ihm in einer derartigen Schönheit, dass er bis ins 19. Jahrhundert hinein kaum überboten wurde. Er musste seine Drucker einweisen und ihnen beibringen, das Papier in drei aufeinanderfolgenden Durchläufen so auszurichten, dass die Noten an den genau richtigen Stellen auf den Notenlinien zu liegen kamen: die Ergebnisse sind erstaunlich exakt, selbst nach heutigen, computergesteuerten Massstäben. Er hatte die Musik auszuwählen und einzurichten: an die 200 Stücke für die ersten drei Bände. Er musste Mittel aufbringen, um das Unternehmen zu finanzieren. Es nimmt wahrlich Wunder, dass ein unbedeutender Mann aus der winzigen Provinzstadt Fossombrone dies in Venedig zustande gebracht haben sollte. Seine eindrucksvollste Leistung aber war, dass er in den kommenden acht Jahren einen beständigen Fluss an neuen Notenbüchern auf den Markt bringen sollte – mehr als fünfzig Veröffentlichungen. In diesen Jahren löste das gedruckte Buch die Handschrift als wichtigstes Medium für die Übermittlung mehrstimmiger Musik ab. Dieser Wandel war das nahezu alleinige Verdienst Petruccis.

Übersetzung: Marc Lewon

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

February 28, 2021

Paper, ink, and pen


The five part books of the calligrapher Robert Dow: a musical self-portrait (1581/88)

Why I'll be there

by David Fallows

 

Twenty years ago, when we were planning to celebrate five hundred years of commercial music printing as represented by Petrucci's Odhecaton, somebody had the bright idea of mounting an 'Odhecathon', namely a massive concert of all ninety-six pieces in the collection. Then we realized it was not such a good idea: it would probably last less than four hours, but it was clearly a recipe for musical indigestion. Moreover, that was only if you took all the pieces without text, as Petrucci presented them. Much of the music was songs in the fixed forms of the fifteenth century, some of them up to fifty years old at the time: to give the music its due we needed to present it at its proper length. More like fifteen hours.

        But that hints at the scope of Petrucci's first undertaking. For very good reasons it holds a place of honor in all histories of music. Petrucci was the first to master the art of printing a large book of mensural polyphony from moveable type. Earlier printed music had been either individual woodblocks or monophonic chant - often confined to only a few pages, though some large and beautiful chant-books had been printed in the previous ten years, particularly in Venice. What Petrucci did needed much more. He had to invent a technique for printing and aligning the notes. He had to engrave and cast a complete new type-fount for music - one of a beauty that was hardly surpassed until the nineteenth century. He had to devise and teach his pressmen to execute a way of aligning the paper in three successive runs through the press so that the notes appeared in precisely the right place on the staves: the results are astonishingly accurate, even by today's computer-driven standards . He had to select and edit the music: some two hundred pieces in his first three volumes. He had to raise the funds to finance the operation. That an obscure man from the tiny provincial town of Fossombrone should have done this in Venice inspires wonder. Most impressive of all his achievements, though, was to keep a steady stream of new music books arriving on the market in the next eight years, more than fifty publications. In those years the main medium for polyphonic music ceased to be the manuscript and became the printed book. That change was almost singlehandedly the work of Petrucci.

Ich bin dabei ...

von David Fallows

 

Als wir vor zwanzig Jahren die Feierlichkeiten für das 500. Jubiläum des kommerziellen Musikdrucks vorbereiteten – verkörpert in Petruccis Odhecaton –, hatte jemand den brillanten Einfall, einen «Odhecathon» aufzulegen, also ein gewaltiges Konzert mit allen 96 Stücken der Sammlung. Dann merkten wir, dass das vielleicht keine so gute Idee wäre: das Ganze würde zwar wohl weniger als vier Stunden dauern, es wäre aber mit Sicherheit ein Rezept für eine musikalische Magenverstimmung. Obendrein ginge diese Rechnung nur auf, wenn alle Stücke textlos aufgeführt würden, so wie Petrucci sie übermittelte. Ein Grossteil der Musik aber bestand aus Liedern in den «formes fixes» des 15. Jahrhunderts (also mit entsprechenden Wiederholungen von Formteilen), wovon einige zum Zeitpunkt des Drucks bereits 50 Jahre alt waren: Um der Musik gerecht zu werden, hätten wir sie in ihrer vollen Länge präsentieren müssen. Also eher um die 15 Stunden Gesamtlänge.

Diese Erkenntnis deutet zugleich aber auch auf das Ausmass von Petruccis Vorhaben hin: dass es einen Ehrenplatz in sämtlichen Musikgeschichten einnimmt hat seinen guten Grund. Petrucci war der erste, der die Kunst meisterte, ein umfangreiches Buch mensuraler Mehrstimmigkeit mit beweglichen Lettern zu drucken. Notendruck vor Petrucci bestand entweder aus einzeln geschnittenen Holzblöcken oder aus einstimmigem Choral – oftmals beschränkt auf nur wenige Seiten, wenngleich in den vorausgegangenen zehn Jahren einige grosse und schöne Choralbücher vor allem in Venedig gedruckt wurden. Was Petrucci unternahm, erforderte wesentlich mehr als das. Er musste eine Technik erfinden, um Noten zu drucken und auszurichten. Er musste einen vollständig neuen Schriftsatz für Musik schneiden und giessen – und das gelang ihm in einer derartigen Schönheit, dass er bis ins 19. Jahrhundert hinein kaum überboten wurde. Er musste seine Drucker einweisen und ihnen beibringen, das Papier in drei aufeinanderfolgenden Durchläufen so auszurichten, dass die Noten an den genau richtigen Stellen auf den Notenlinien zu liegen kamen: die Ergebnisse sind erstaunlich exakt, selbst nach heutigen, computergesteuerten Massstäben. Er hatte die Musik auszuwählen und einzurichten: an die 200 Stücke für die ersten drei Bände. Er musste Mittel aufbringen, um das Unternehmen zu finanzieren. Es nimmt wahrlich Wunder, dass ein unbedeutender Mann aus der winzigen Provinzstadt Fossombrone dies in Venedig zustande gebracht haben sollte. Seine eindrucksvollste Leistung aber war, dass er in den kommenden acht Jahren einen beständigen Fluss an neuen Notenbüchern auf den Markt bringen sollte – mehr als fünfzig Veröffentlichungen. In diesen Jahren löste das gedruckte Buch die Handschrift als wichtigstes Medium für die Übermittlung mehrstimmiger Musik ab. Dieser Wandel war das nahezu alleinige Verdienst Petruccis.

Übersetzung: Marc Lewon

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

February 28, 2021

Paper, ink, and pen


The five part books of the calligrapher Robert Dow: a musical self-portrait (1581/88)

Why I’ll be there …

by David Fallows

 

These days, whenever five viols players are gathered together, somebody is going to haul out the Dow Partbooks. There are lots of good reasons for that. One is that there is a gorgeous published facsimile, all in full colour, issued only ten years ago. Another is that everything is beautifully legible: Robert Dow, who was a lawyer by profession and also a fellow of All Souls College, had actually been employed as a teacher of penmanship. Every page of his partbooks is a delight to the eye, copied in black ink on printed red staves. And that’s a bizarre detail: there is now quite an industry identifying and researching printed music staves in the sixteenth century, of which there are a lot; Dow seems to be the only known example printed in red. Perhaps he commissioned it specially.

              But the main reason is that this is an absolutely marvellous anthology of the music that was available in England in the 1580s. Lots of Robert White, fair amounts of Tallis, Parsons, Tye and Strodgers; oddly only a single piece by Taverner, but then he had died in 1545; also a few works from overseas, including three by Lassus and two by Vincenzo Ruffo; but above all over fifty pieces by Byrd, from the first twenty years of his composing career – a reminder that if he had died not at the age of eighty but at the age of forty he would still count as one of the most glorious and resourceful composers of all time.

              Latin motets make up most of the books: there are only a few pieces of church music in English; a fair number of consort songs and thirteen purely instrumental pieces. In the early years of Elizabeth’s reign composers produced plenty of Latin motets, whereas the music written for the Anglican church was at this point mostly quite simple. But the main point here is that Dow’s choice of pieces was all from the top drawer.

Ich bin dabei …

von David Fallows

Wann immer dieser Tage fünf Gamben zusammenkommen, wird eine von ihnen unweigerlich die Dow-Stimmbücher hervorziehen. Dafür gibt es viele gute Gründe. Einer davon ist das vor erst 10 Jahren veröffentlichte, herrliche Farbfaksimile. Ein weiterer ist, dass die Handschrift so wunderbar klar lesbar ist: Robert Dow, von Beruf Jurist und zugleich Mitglied des All Souls College in Oxford, war tatsächlich als Lehrer für Schönschrift angestellt. Jede einzelne Seite seiner Stimmbücher ist eine Augenweide: schwarze Tinte auf vorgedruckten, roten Notenlinien. Und letztere sind ein seltsames Phänomen: mittlerweile wird mit grossem Fleiss an der Erforschung und Erfassung gedruckten Notenpapiers aus dem 16. Jahrhundert gearbeitet – und davon gibt es viel; die Dow-Stimmbücher scheinen der einzig bekannte Fall mit roten Notenlinien zu sein. Vielleicht hatte Dow das Papier eigens für sich in Auftrag gegeben.

Der Hauptgrund für die heutige Beliebtheit der Stimmbücher aber ist, dass sie eine absolut fantastische Zusammenstellung von Musik aus dem England der 1580er Jahre enthalten: viel von Robert White, einiges von Tallis, Parsons, Tye und Strodgers; seltsamerweise nur ein einziges Stück von Taverner, der aber war immerhin schon 1545 verstorben; ferner ein paar Werke von jenseits des Kanals, einschliesslich dreier Stücke von Lassus und zweier von Vincenzo Ruffo; vor allen anderen aber sticht Byrd mit über 50 Stücken hervor, die aus den ersten 20 Jahren seiner Kompositionskarriere stammen – eine kleine Erinnerung daran, dass er, selbst wenn er nicht erst mit 80 sondern bereits im Alter von 40 Jahren gestorben wäre, immer noch als einer der glanzvollsten und einfallsreichsten Komponisten aller Zeiten gelten würde.

Lateinische Motetten beherrschen einen Grossteil der Stimmbücher: es sind nur wenige kirchenmusikalische Kompositionen auf Englisch enthalten, einige Consort Songs und 13 rein instrumentale Stücke. In den frühen Jahren der Regierungszeit von Queen Elizabeth brachten die Komponisten zahlreiche lateinische Motetten hervor, dieweil die Musik, die für die anglikanische Kirche geschrieben wurde, zu dieser Zeit grösstenteils eher schlicht war. Der entscheidende Punkt hier ist jedoch, dass Dows Stückauswahl ausschliesslich aus der obersten Schublade erstklassiger Werke stammt.

Übersetzung Marc Lewon

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by Prof. Dr. Dr. hc David Fallows

December 2020

«Cantata!»

Music around Orlando di Lasso to listen to, watch and sing along to?

Why I’ll be there …

by David Fallows

 

For the last forty-five years I have celebrated Christmas in Manchester; but coronavirus makes it impossible for us to get there. On the other hand, we shall be spared the miserable Victorian music that the British seem to prefer for their Christmas celebrations. Instead, we get to hear Advent music from Lassus, Palestrina and other late sixteenth-century composers. That seems closer to the mark. 

And the added thrill that we get to sing with them if we want. I shall certainly be there, taking part in Basel’s celebration of the season. As I write, the whole world seems to be celebrating the election of Joe Biden: suddenly the news outlets are full of positive messages after a year of ever more dismal reports. I fully anticipate that we shall all be looking forward to a better 2021; and what better way to do so than in song?

Ich bin dabei ...

Übersetzung von Marc Lewon

45 Jahre lang habe ich Weihnachten immer in Manchester gefeiert; das Coronavirus aber macht eine Reise dorthin für uns unmöglich. Andererseits bleibt uns dadurch die erbärmliche viktorianische Musik erspart, die die Briten für ihre Weihnachtsfeiern zu bevorzugen scheinen. Stattdessen dürfen wir Adventsmusik von Lassus, Palestrina und anderen Komponisten des späten 16. Jahr­hunderts hören. Das kommt besser hin.

Und was es noch spannender macht: wenn wir mitsingen dürfen. Ich werde auf jeden Fall dabei sein und an Basels Weihnachts­feierlichkeiten teilnehmen. Während ich schreibe scheint die gesamte Welt die Wahl von Joe Biden zu feiern: mit einem Male sind alle Kanäle voller positiver Meldungen nach einem langen Jahr andauernder, düsterer Nachrichten. Ich erwarte voll und ganz, dass wir uns auf ein besseres Jahr 2021 freuen dürfen; und wie sollte man das besser begehen können als mit Liedern?

Übersetzung Marc Lewon

The monthly column for ReRenaissance by David Fallows

November 2020

"Nowell, nowell"

15th century Advent carols

Why I’ll be there …

by David Fallows

 

Encountering the English carols of the fifteenth century in my first year as a student was a decisive moment in my life. My main musical interests up to that point were what you could call standard for any music students in the 1970s. It started with Beethoven and Brahms; then I found out about Schoenberg and Webern; and inevitably I progressed from there to Stockhausen and Boulez. Obviously I had heard a few recordings of medieval music (only a few, because there weren’t that many around and some of them were truly awful), but it was hearing and singing the carols that changed my life; and from that moment on the music of the fifteenth century became my main preoccupation, as it is to this day.

What struck me first were the earliest carols, probably of the years 1415–1430: here there was a freshness of colour and a broader cultural resonance that repeatedly evoked a community. And above all there was the simplicity, the directness of expression, the sheer lack of pretension that made so much of the music instantly attractive. Later I came to the carols in Ritson’s manuscript, probably of the 1430s and early 1440s: far more elaborate and ambitious. And only much later, with the publication of the Fayrfax manuscript in 1976 (and the gorgeous LP of its music made at about the same time by the Hilliard Consort with Judith Nelson), did I realise that this repertory contained some of the most luminous music ever composed in England.

Nothing on earth will keep me away from a concert of this music.

Ich bin dabei ...

Übersetzung von Marc Lewon

Einer der Schlüsselmomente in meinem Leben war die Begegnung mit den englischen Carols des 15. Jahrhunderts in meinem ersten Studienjahr. Meine musikalischen Hauptinteressen waren zunächst ähnlich gelagert, wie die der meisten Musikstudenten der 1970er Jahre. Ich fing bei Beethoven und Brahms an, entdeckte dann Schönberg und Webern und schritt von dort aus unweigerlich zu Stockhausen und Boulez voran. Offfensichtlich hatte ich zu dieser Zeit bereits einige Einspielungen mittelalterlicher Musik gehört (nur wenige, denn es gab damals nicht sehr viele und einige davon waren wirklich ganz furchtbar), aber es war das Singen und Hören der Carols, was mein Leben für immer verändern sollte: Von diesem Augenblick an und bis auf den heutigen Tag wurde die Musik des 15. Jahrhunderts zu meiner Hauptbeschäfitgung.
Es waren die frühesten Carols aus der Zeit von 1415–1430, die mich zuerst fesselten: hier spürte ich eine Frische der Farben und einen immer wieder das kulturelle Gemeinschaftsgefühl ansprechenden Widerhall. Insbesondere aber war da eine Schlichtheit und eine Unmittelbarkeit im Ausdruck, ohne Anzeichen irgendeiner Grossspurigkeit – was den Grossteil der Musik auf Anhieb ansprechend
machte. Später lernte ich die wesentlich aufwändigeren und ambitionierteren Carols aus dem Ritson Manuscript kennen, die wahrscheinlich aus den 1430ern und frühen 1440ern datieren. Erst lange danach, bei der Veröff entlichung des Fayrfax Manuscripts 1976 (und der wundervollen LP, die in etwa zeitgleich vom Hilliard Consort mit Judith Nelson aufgenommen wurde), wurde mir klar, dass dieses Repertoire einige der strahlendsten Musikstücke enthält, die jemals in England komponiert wurden.

Nichts auf der Welt wird mich von einem Konzert mit dieser Musik abhalten können.

Übersetzung Marc Lewon

David Fallows' monthly column

October 2020

"Il Capriccioso"

Northern Italian instrumental music a commodo de virtuosi

Why I'll be there

 

People who attend the parallel (and much older) series of Abendmusiken in the Predigerkirche will know that a concert devoted entirely to a single composer is often more satisfying than when works by others are interspersed. And I find it is the same with earlier music: at first blush, you may think that a concert devoted to the music of, say, Ockeghem would be a touch boring, but my experience has always been that in the course of the event you get a lot closer to the essence of the thing if there's nothing else to distract you.

For this concert the focus is not just on one composer, Vincenzo Ruffo, but on a single collection, his 1564 Capricci. He was amazingly prolific as a composer of masses, motets and particularly madrigals. But the Capricci contains just twenty-three pieces for three instruments - his only known instrumental music. And we almost lost the book: the only complete copy is in the Vatican library. But it is the most marvelous collection of varied pieces: dances, abstract fantasies, paraphrases of Italian madrigals or French chansons, examples of what an instrumental group would do with various ideas.

Needless to say, I have never heard a concert devoted to Ruffo, let alone one devoted to his Capricci. But my tongue is hanging out in anticipation.

 

Ich bin dabei ...

Wer die Konzertreihe der Abendmusiken in der Predigerkirche kennt, die (wenn auch schon viele Jahre länger) parallel zu den Konzerten von ReRenaissance stattfindet, weiß, dass ein Konzert, das nur einem einzigen Komponisten gewidmet ist, in der Regel befriedigender ist als eines, bei dem Werke anderer Komponisten hinzugemischt werden. Ich finde, dass das Gleiche für frühere Musik gilt: Auf den ersten Blick mag man denken, dass ein Konzert, das nur der Musik eines Komponisten, z.B. Ockeghems, gewidmet ist, ein wenig eintönig sein könnte. Ich habe jedoch immer wieder feststellen dürfen, dass man im Laufe der Veranstaltung der Essenz der Sache an sich viel näherkommt, wenn nichts hinzukommt, das davon ablenken könnte.

Für dieses Konzert liegt das Augenmerk nicht nur auf einem Komponisten, Vincenzo Ruffo, sondern sogar auf nur einer einzigen Sammlung, nämlich den Capricci von 1564. Ruffo war ein ungemein produktiver Komponist von Messen, Motetten und besonders von Madrigalen. Die Capricci sind eine Sammlung von nur 23 Stücken für drei Instrumente – die einzige von ihm überlieferte Instrumentalmusik. Und beinahe hätten wir auch dieses Buch verloren: Das einzige vollständige Exemplar liegt in der Biblioteca Vaticana. Es ist aber eine wundervolle Sammlung verschiedenartiger Stücke: Tänze, abstrakte Fantasien, Paraphrasen über italienische Madrigale und französische Chansons; Beispiele dafür, was ein Instrumentalensemble aus unterschiedlichen Vorlagen machen würde.

Es erübrigt sich die Feststellung, dass ich nie zuvor ein Konzert gehört habe, dass Ruffo oder gar seine Capricci in den Mittelpunkt gestellt hätte. Doch in Vorfreude darauf läuft mir bereits jetzt das Wasser im Munde zusammen.

Übersetzung: Tabea Schwartz & Marc Lewon

The monthly column

- this time by Prof. Dr. Martin Kirnbauer

  September 2020

 

"The one howls with the wolves"

Homage to the last singer Michel Beheim (* 1420)

«Ich bin dabei»

 

In Zeiten, in denen der Literatur-Nobelpreis an einen Singer-Songwriter (2016 an Bob Dylan) verliehen wird, oder wie aktuell der sogenannte «Bard-Core» im Internet einen Hype auslöst, indem Pop-Hits neu in ein ‘mittelalterliches’ Klanggewand eingekleidet werden – in solchen Zeiten sollte man sich wieder für das ‘Original’ interessieren. Und der Held des ReRenaissance-Konzertes im September ist ein solches Original.

Die heutige Fachwissenschaft nennt Michel Beheim (1420–1472/9) etwas sperrig und unsexy Sangspruchdichter, er selbst bezeichnete sich mit dem hübschen Ausdruck «fürtreter», was auch auf den Anspruch gegenüber seinen Performance-Qualitäten hinweist. Und diese gehen bei dem Blick auf sein schriftlich überliefertes Werk in aller Regel vergessen.

Als ich vor über 20 Jahren seinen Personen-Eintrag im New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians revidieren durfte, hatte ich kein einziges seiner über 450 Lieder je gehört. Wohl nicht zuletzt deshalb blieben mir seine Lieder und die von ihm geprägten ‘Töne’ einigermassen abstrakt. Umso neugieriger bin ich also, wie Ivo Haun als «fürtreter» Beheims Lieder nun interpretieren wird.

Heute würde man sagen «When in Rome, do as the Romans do» (bei Michel Beheim heisst es analog «Wer mit den Wölfen heult») – was handkehrum im Alte Musik-begeisterten Basel bedeutet: In die Barfüsserkirche kommen und zuhören!

David Fallows' monthly column
August 2020

Winds and Waves

In the footsteps of the ship's trumpeter Zorzi Trombetta

Why I'll be there

One of the amazing events in my own lifetime was the raising of the Mary Rose, Henry VIII's prize ship that had unexpectedly sunk with 500 sailors on board in full view of Henry VIII and his court during the Battle of the Solent in 1545. In 1982 the technology was available to raise the ship; and its preservation was so good that many surprising details became clear. Among the items recovered were two fiddles, a bow, three tabor pipes, a tabor and a still shawm - all apparently needed for a warship defending the country against a French invasion. Just a year earlier, Daniel Leech-Wilkinson had published his article about a British Library manuscript none of us had taken very seriously, because it seemed so chaotic and scattershot. This was the manuscript of the Venetian sailor Zorzi Trombetta, now Cotton Titus A.xxvi. He showed that its musical contents were plainly copied for an ensemble aboard a ship traveling out of Venice; and there seemed, still seems, a great likelihood that most of the music was written down in versions for an ensemble of shawms and slide-trumpet, namely what we call an alta capella. For my own part, I have used the manuscript many times for various publications over the years but have never actually heard the music performed by an alta capella. That's why I shall be there.

Eines der grossartigen Ereignisse, das zu meinen Lebzeiten stattfand, war die Bergung der Mary Rose – das Prisenschiff Heinrichs VIII, das 1545 während der Seeschlacht im Solent mit 500 Seeleuten an Bord überraschend und in Anwesenheit von Heinrich VIII und seinem Hofstaat vor aller Augen gesunken war. 1982 war schliesslich die Technologie zur Hebung des Schiffs verfügbar; und sein Erhaltungszustand war dermassen gut, dass viele erstaunliche Details zutage traten. Unter den geborgenen Gegenständen befanden sich zwei Fideln, ein Streichbogen, drei Einhandflöten, eine Trommel und eine „stille“ Schalmei – allesamt offenbar notwendig für ein Kriegsschiff, das England gegen eine französische Invasion zu verteidigen hatte. Nur ein Jahr zuvor hatte Daniel Leech-Wilkinson seinen Artikel über eine Handschrift der British Library veröffentlicht, die zuvor keiner von uns besonders ernst genommen hatte, da sie einen so chaotischen und beliebigen Eindruck machte. Es handelte sich um die Handschrift des venezianischen Seemanns Zorzi Trombetta, die jetzt unter der Signatur Cotton Titus A.xxvi zu finden ist. Leech-Wilkinson zeigte, dass die musikalischen Teile der Handschrift ganz einfach für ein Ensemble an Bord eines Schiffs niedergeschrieben wurden, das von Venedig aus segelte; und es schien, und scheint immer noch, dass der grösste Teil der Musik wohl Bearbeitungen für ein Ensemble aus Schalmeien und Zugtrompete sind, also das, was wir eine Alta Capella nennen. Ich für meinen Teil habe für verschiedene Veröffentlichungen über die Jahre hinweg immer wieder auf diese Handschrift zurückgegriffen, die Musik aber nie von einer Alta Capella gespielt gehört. Darum werde ich dabei sein.

The monthly column
July 2020

Unheard of from the Loire Valley

New music from the Leuven Chansonnier  

Why I'll be there

We have all had dreams of a sudden musical discovery in an obscure Spanish castle. In fact, about forty years ago there was a story of Monteverdi's Arianna having turned up that way; and around the same time another told of Dufay's mass for the dedication of Santa Maria del Fiore. Neither ever materialized. And actually the surprises all came from major national libraries that we thought were fully cataloged: the unique Portuguese keyboard tablature print that had been cataloged as a book of arithmetic in the Spanish royal library; the marvelous French chansonnier that arrived when somebody ordered microfilms of the well-known music manuscripts 76b, 76c and 76d in the Uppsala university library but decided to order 76a while he was at it; the precious Egenolff printed music books that had been in the Swiss national library since the 1890s but had not made it into any of the international music cataloging projects because their musical holdings are mostly modern.

But the discovery of the Leuven chansonnier was the real deal. It had been bought in a job lot - together with an illuminated visitation and a wooden statue of Our Lady - for € 3600 by a dealer in Brussels, who about a year later thought to consult a music historian to see if it was of any interest . Professor David Burn at the University of Leuven immediately saw that this was a classic French song-book of the years around 1470, like the long-famous books in Wolfenbüttel, Dijon, and Copenhagen, but smaller in dimensions (120 x 85 mm) and more consistently copied and decorated. Like those manuscripts, its contents were mostly known songs, but twelve of the fifty were new; and among the known songs there were many fascinating new readings. A favorite of mine is in the opening piece, Walter Frye's Ave regina celorum. I had recently published an edition from the twenty-three sources then known, from all corners of Europe. In two places there were musical impossibilities that could be resolved only be drawing on readings from absurdly peripheral sources: the results were not particularly elegant but they worked. Leuven had unique and thoroughly elegant readings for both. Prodigal son likes are an understatement: the warmest possible of welcomes to you, Leuven!

Wir haben alle schon einmal davon geträumt, plötzlich auf einer verborgenen Burg in Spaniens Bergen eine unvermutete musikalische Entdeckung zu machen. Und tatsächlich machte vor rund 40 Jahren eine solche Geschichte über die Auffindung von Monteverdis Arianna die Runde; eine weitere dieser Art berichtete zur etwa gleichen Zeit von der Entdeckung von Dufays Messe zur Einweihung von Santa Maria del Fiore in Florenz. Weder die eine noch die andere trat ein. Und in Wirklichkeit kommen die Überraschungen allesamt aus den grossen Nationalbibliotheken, von denen wir glaubten, sie seien vollständig katalogisiert: der einzigartige Druck einer portugiesischen Tastentabulatur, der in der Königlichen Bibliothek von Spanien als Buch über Arithmetik katalogisiert wurde; das prächtige französische Chansonnier, das auftauchte, als jemand Mikrofilme der weithin bekannten Musikhandschriften 76b, 76c und 76d aus der Universitätsbibliothek von Uppsala bestellte und sich kurzerhand entschloss auch noch 76a zu bestellen, wo er schon dabei war; die kostbaren Musikdrucke von Egenolff, die seit den 1890ern in der Schweizer Nationalbibliothek lagerten, es aber nicht in eines der internationalen Katalogisierungs-projekte geschafft hatten, weil ihre Musikbestände überwie-gend neuzeitlich waren.

Die Entdeckung des Leuven Chansonniers aber war eine Entdeckung im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes! Es wurde als Teil eines Sammelpostens – gemeinsam mit einer illuminierten Mariä Heimsuchungsszene und einer hölzernen Marienstatue – für 3600 € von einem Brüsseler Händler ersteigert, der ungefähr ein Jahr später auf den Gedanken kam, einen Musikhistoriker hinzuzuziehen, um einschätzen zu lassen, ob es von besonderem Interesse sein könnte. Professor David Burn von der Universität Leuven erkannte sofort, dass es sich um eine klassische französische Liedersammlung aus der Zeit um 1470 handelte, so wie die längst berühmten Chansonniers von Wolfenbüttel, Dijon und Kopenhagen, aber von kleinerem Format (120 x 85 mm) und einheitlicher geschrieben und verziert. Wie in den genannten Handschriften bestand auch der Inhalt des Leuven Chansonniers vorwiegend aus bekannten Lieder, 12 der 50 Einträge aber waren neu; und unter den bekannten Liedern befanden sich obendrein einige faszinierende neue Lesarten. Mein Favorit ist das Eröffnungsstück, Walter Fryes Ave regina celorum. Ich habe vor kurzem eine Edition des Stücks aus den bis dato 23 bekannten Quellen aus ganz Europa veröffentlicht. An zwei Stellen gab es musikalische Unmöglichkeiten, die nur durch die Konsultation abwegig randständiger Quellen gelöst werden konnten: die Ergebnisse waren nicht besonders elegant, aber sie funktionierten. Das Leuven Chansonnier bot eine sowohl einmalige wie durch und durch elegante Fassung für beide Stellen. Ein Vergleich mit der Geschichte vom «verlorenen Sohn» ist eine Untertreibung: sei aufs freundlichste Willkommen geheissen, Leuven Chansonnier!       Übersetzung Marc Lewon

Special column | Corona 2020

On Coronas

Attention: This "manuscript" is a version adapted by Marc Lewon for current events; Text partly new, partly also Coronae;)

 

On the ReRenaissance website you can see a reproduction of the melody Maria zart albeit with the less familiar text 'Maria schon du tragst die cron' and with several coronas towards the end. Most of them have the shape of a curve with three dots below it, but one of them has an actual crown - which I don't remember having seen in sources later than the trouvère generation, where it denoted a 'cantus coronatus', a crowned song. Just as in countless hymnbooks even today, the coronas in Maria zart denote simply the end of a line. The only difference is that the first few lines here have no such coronas. But what remains true is that most people treat the coronas here as just an indication that the line ends: in the recording by the musicians of ReRenaissance , the lines with a corona sound more or less the same as those without. Theoretically, perhaps they could indicate a certain lengthening of the note; but in practice that is hardly realistic.

Coronas vary in shape. Sometimes they are a curve with a single dot below it. Sometimes they are like a hook with two dots below. And nobody is at all clear whether there is any logic to the difference, any more than they are clear whether to call it corona or signum congruentiae or fermata or pause. (Those who want to know more could benefit by reading the excellent article 'Cantus coronatus' by Wolf Frobenius in the new MGG .)

For six hundred years music historians have been puzzled about Dufay's use of the corona. At the end of his Flos florum , for example, there is a string of seventeen longs (in all three voices), each surmounted by a corona; and in his motet Supremum est mortalibus bonum there is a similar string of notes in all three voices, some longs some only breves. One theory was that the musicians should improvise over those notes; but the late Alejandro Enrique Planchart noted that 'the medieval references are too unclear and contradictory and thus far all modern attempts at such ornamentation I have heard sound very unsatisfactory'. So perhaps just a slight lengthening is meant. Let's just hope that the coronavirus doesn't keep researchers puzzled as long as Dufay's coronas.

 

David Fallows' monthly column

June 2020

Cheerful beings
The songbook of Riehen reformer Ambrosius Kettenacker (1508/10)

 

Surely it was a great idea to open the series 'ReRenaissance' in Basel with a concert of music from one of the smallest songbooks in the University Library. Small because it is a personal collection of just twenty-eight songs; and small because all that we have today is the bass partbook. But much of the rest can be assembled from prints and manuscripts of the time. At the back of the book there is an inscription: "Ambrosius Ketenacker dedit Bonifacio Amorbachio Basiliensi hos libbellulos quatuor Anno MDX" ("Ambrosius Kettenacker gave Bonifacius Amerbach of Basel these four little books in 1510"). Ambrosius matriculated into the University of Basel in 1508; he was later a parish priest for the reformed church in Riehen.

Kettenacker's dedication to Amerbach

It is also small because of its dimensions, 16 x 11 cm. Later in the sixteenth century there were even smaller music books: the most famous ones are the prints of Christian Egenolff in Frankfurt, some of them only 11 x 8 cm; and in the Basel University Library there are several sets of manuscript partbooks the same size. But those were extremes. What Ambrosius copied was perhaps convenient for his music-making activities as a student in Basel. Small, in fact very small, but not too small to be read conveniently, with its broad staves - only three to a page - and comfortably large note-heads.

What is hard to answer is how he performed the music. Did he use viols, only within the last twenty years introduced in Spain and Italy? Or was it recorders, more easily made and evidently popular for over a century. Or did he use some of the more exotic instruments portrayed in the same years in Sebastian Virdung's book Musica getutscht printed in Basel in 1511: crumhorns, shawms, cornettos or rebecs? Or did he just sing, even though very few of the pieces in his bass partbook have texts. Sadly, his book offers no useful hints as to the expected scoring.

Sebastian Virdung: Musica tutscht, Basel 1511 "Big Violins"

"Trumscheit and clein violins"

Ambrosius Kettenacker: "Frölich Wesen", FX 10 Basel UB

A. Kettenacker: "Who büwen the miserable because", FX 10 Basel UB

Ich bin dabei...

von David Fallows

 

 

Es ist eine großartige Idee, die neue Basler Konzertreihe „ReRenaissance“ mit Musik aus einem der kleinsten Liederbücher der Universitätsbibliothek zu eröffnen. Klein, weil es eine private Sammlung mit nur 28 Liedern ist – klein aber auch, weil von  vier  Bänden  nur  das Bassstimmbuch bis heute erhalten ist. Ein Großteil der fehlenden Stimmen lässt sich jedoch aus anderen zeitgenössischen Handschriften und Drucken erschliessen. Auf der letzten Seite des Büchleins findet sich die Inschrift: „Ambrosius Ketenacker dedit Bonifacio  Amorbachio Basiliensi hos libbellulos quatuor Anno MDX“ („Ambrosius Kettenacker übergab Bonifacius Amerbach von Basel diese vier Büchlein im Jahre 1510“). Ambrosius schrieb sich 1508 an der Basler Universität ein und wurde später Priester der reformierten Kirche in Riehen.

Sein Liederbuch ist aber auch aufgrund seines Formats klein: es misst nur 11x16 cm2. Etwas später im 16. Jahrhundert gab es sogar noch kleinere Musikbücher: die berühmtesten sind wohl die Drucke von Christian Egenolff in Frankfurt, von denen einige nur 11x8 cm2 messen und in der Basler Universitätsbibliothek gibt es einige handschriftliche Stimmbuchsätze ähnlicher Grösse. Aber das sind Extremfälle. Was und wie Ambrosius notierte war vermutlich für die musikalischen Aktivitäten eines Studenten in Basel bestimmt und angepasst. Das Liederbuch ist klein, sehr klein sogar, aber nicht zu klein, um noch bequem lesbar zu sein, mit entsprechend breiten Liniensystemen – nur drei davon pro Seite – und angenehm großen Notenköpfen.

Schwerer zu beantworten ist die Frage, wie er die Musik aufführte. Verwendete er Gamben (zu Kettenackers Zeit auch "Groß Geigen" genannt), die erst 20 Jahre zuvor in Spanien und Italien eingeführt wurden? Oder kamen Blockflöten zum Einsatz, die einfacher herzustellen waren und offenbar über ein Jahrhundert lang populär waren? Oder setzte er einige der exotischeren Instrumente ein, die zur gleichen Zeit in Sebastian Virdungs Musica getutscht abgebildet sind – gedruckt 1511 in Basel: Krummhorn, Schalmei, Zink oder Rebec? Oder sang er einfach nur, selbst wenn im Bass-Stimmbuch nur wenige Liedtexte enthalten sind. Leider gibt uns das Büchlein keine Hinweise auf die beabsichtigten Besetzungen.

Übersetzung Marc Lewon